Art = the cost of fabrication

A lot of my time in grad school has been the realization (at least in my program- fashion) that if you want people to invest in your work, you have to too.

 

In my undergrad , while studying painting, I would have been horrified to realize that it’s becoming more and more rare for art to be made by the artists themselves. If the artist is a successful working artist today, there is probably a strong likelihood that their art has been professionally fabricated or it wouldn’t have existed without the help of 15 studio assistants.

 

It’s very possible that is train of thought is quite cynical.  But as I walk through museums and galleries today and approach works of art, I think to myself “WOW I can’ t imagine how the artist found funding to fabricate this.”

 

So how do you approach this world if you are an art student?  It’s usually the other way around right?  You get a job and make a lot of money and then spend it and impress people.  But in the art world you are supposed to compete and contend with art being made that has an extraordinary budget before you have a job that gives you income to make your work.  Which then starts the cycle – – if you have a job that supports the work you make, that job takes away from studio time. 

 

It’s just not possible to be the starving artist that everyone romanticizes about.  You can’t be starving and broke and get a 5000$ piece of art fabricated for your next gallery show. 

 

Check out this article in the New York times that talks about a Jeff Koons piece that will take 25 million dollars to fabricate. . . . http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/27/arts/design/27fink.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

Image

 

 

So what’s next ?– dream up big projects and then brainstorm how you will fund it.

 

 If I figure all this out, I’ll let you know.  In the mean time I’ll continue to use my student loans and maxing out my 1 credit card to try and pay my extraordinary art school tuition costs and fabricate interesting enough art to try and get a foundation in this field.

 

 

 

Lwhittle

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