Art Expo Highlights

Image

Image

Greg Bogin for Leo Koenig

Image

David Klamen for Richard Gray

Image

Image

Ettore Spalletti for Galarie Lelong

Image

Tom Wesselmann for Galerie Terminus. 

This being my first art fair experience, I walked into Navy Pier last Friday with a pessimistic expectation. I’ve heard tons of negative feedback about the quality of work and experience of the venue at Expo Chicago. I was ready for a Sam’s Club-like experience filled with tons of bad painting and archaic sculpture. But, after about 15 minutes of browsing I found myself pleasantly surprised by some of the work I saw. Looking past the convention center atmosphere and the false gallery booths I actually began to decipher a number of pretty arousing pieces.  

Greg Bogin’s Sci Fi/Pop Artish/Post-Minimal/Color field painting (whatever category it falls in) and fluorescent urethane casted sculpture caught my eye for sure. I’ve seen Bogin’s work  online but I’ve never gotten a chance to encounter it in person. It was great to see the rounded dimensionality of his wall piece and the high quality finish he uses on his painted gradients. I was particularly jazzed on the speckled black and purple border of the painting, and to be frank, it was really that fucking rad. Brought me to ruminate some of my childhood Easter experiences of eating those speckled easter egg candies. 

Browsing along, sifting through the good from the bad I noticed some great late 60’s early 70’s work from John McCracken, Ed Rushca, Carlos Cruz-Diez , Rauschenberg, and Warhol. The Tom Wesselman in the Galerie Terminus booth was one of the best pieces of his I’ve seen. Bordering both object and painting, his shaped painting of a faceless nude woman drifiting back into an odd perspective is perplexing, smart, and funny. Rendered in his typical pop art palette with soft edges, air brushed gradients, and a lack of detail; this painting is sexy! 

Other highlights I saw was David Klamens painting of a galaxy painting in a museum, Ettore Spalletti sliced edge wall piece, and Andreas Lolis cardboard and styrofoam objects made in marble. All in all the bad might have slightly outweighed the good, but the good was great enough to keep me in the facility for 2 hours. It was definitely exciting to see such a wide range of works in one container, regardless of how over saturated the venue was. 

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s